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Bone Spurs

Bone spurs, also known as osteophytes, are bony projections that develop along the edges of bones. They are most commonly found in joints — where bones meet — but can also appear on bones where tendons, ligaments, and muscles attach. Bone spurs are often associated with aging and are a common condition. While they can occur in any bone, they’re most often found in areas such as the spine, shoulders, hands, hips, knees, and feet.

Causes of Bone Spurs

Bone spurs form as the result of the body trying to repair itself by building extra bone. This process can be triggered by several factors:

  • Osteoarthritis: The most common cause of bone spurs is osteoarthritis, a condition that results from cartilage breakdown in joints, leading to inflammation and changes in bone structure.
  • Spinal Stenosis: Spurs can also form in response to changes in the spine that narrow the space for nerves and the spinal cord.
  • Disc Degeneration: Aging and wear on the intervertebral discs can lead to bone spur formation in the spine.
  • Joint Damage: Damage from accidents or sports injuries can lead to spurs.
  • Inflammatory Conditions: Conditions like diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) can cause extensive bone spur formation.
  • Overuse: Repetitive motion or excessive pressure on joints, common in certain sports or occupations, can trigger spur development.

Symptoms of Bone Spurs

Bone spurs themselves often cause no symptoms and can go undetected for years. When symptoms do occur, they are typically the result of the spur rubbing against adjacent nerves or tissues, or because the spur restricts movement. Symptoms can include:

  • Pain in the affected joint
  • Reduced range of motion
  • Numbness or tingling if a nerve is compressed
  • Swelling and tenderness

Back Pain in Ribs

Experiencing thoracic spine and rib pain? Learn more about what could be causing this and the treatment options that can provide lasting relief. Back pain in the ribs can be a common and often debilitating condition, causing discomfort and limiting mobility for many individuals. The pain can range from mild to severe and may be caused by various underlying conditions. Understanding the many causes of rib and back pain is important and can assist in securing an accurate diagnosis. Treatment options vary depending on the underlying cause and severity of symptoms.

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Can’t Straighten Knee

Your knee is capable of moving in a number of directions. The most common are flexion and extension. Flexion is when you bend your knee and the shin bone moves towards the buttock. Knee extension is when you straighten out your knee. The extension is the opposite of flexion. PT, trainers, and physicians alike measure the degree of knee flexion and extension. When lying flat on an examination table or hard surface your knee should be able to extend so that there is no angle between the thigh and shin bone. The inability to straighten the knee is also known as an extension lag and is a reason for concern.

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Cervicalgia / Neck Pain

Cervicalgia is also known as neck pain, which is an all-too-common, unpleasant pain. Read here to learn the symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment options. We will discuss other causes for cervicalgia. What symptoms are associated with cervicalgia? How is cervicalgia diagnosed? What are the treatment options for cervicalgia? Cervicalgia is a medical term used to describe neck pain. It is very common and affects approximately 2/3 of the population at some point in their life. Cervicalgia is the 4th major cause of disability. Risk factors include injury, prior history of neck and musculoskeletal pain, jobs that require a lot of desk work, low social support, job insecurity, physical weakness, and poor computer station setup.

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Feeling Of Pins And Needles In Fingers

Are you experiencing the sensation of pins and needles in your fingertips? This is a common symptom of cervical radiculopathy. Although many conditions can cause pins and needles, if it is accompanied by neck pain, then cervical radiculopathy would be at the top of the diagnostic list. Cervical radiculopathy also referred to as a “pinched nerve.”  is a medical syndrome that occurs when a nerve root in the neck ( cervical spine) becomes compressed or irritated leading to symptoms that include pain, numbness, tingling, and potentially weakness. It occurs in about 85 people per 100,000 (1). Read this post to find out more about cervical radiculopathy and how it can cause pins and needles in your fingertips.

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Hand Ligament Pain

Our hands are critical to everything we do. The hand is composed of 27 bones which are kept together by ligaments. Ligaments are thick bands of connective tissue that connect one bone to another. They provide important stability. Ligaments are susceptible to injury which is called a sprain. Approximately 25% of all sports-related injuries involve the hand or wrist (1). Ligament injuries are graded from one to three based upon their severity. – Grade 1: Is a partial sprain without instability. – Grade 2: Intermediate sprain with partial thickness tear of the ligament – Grade 3: Complete tear of the ligament. There are numerous ligaments in the hand…

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Hands Stiff in the Morning

Hand stiffness can make simple tasks overwhelming. Why are my hands stiff in the morning? What are the treatment options for hand stiff in the morning? Are there new, natural treatment options to treat hands that are stiff in the morning? Our hands are central to virtually everything we do. Stiffness can compromise function and cause pain. What are the causes of hand stiffness in the morning? There are many which include: excessive daily wear and tear, medications that can cause hand swelling and stiffness. Common examples include hormones, calcium channel blockers for high blood pressure, steroids, anti-depressants, and NSAIDs, Diets high in salt, alcohol, and trauma.

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Leg Gives Out

Have you ever been walking and your leg gives out? It can be both surprising and alarming What would cause your leg to give out? Can sciatica cause your leg to give out? How do you treat weak legs? Let’s dig in.Weakness in the leg can arise from three principal sources: nerve problems, muscle weakness, and SI joint dysfunction. Weakness in the legs may indicate a significant nerve problem. In many cases, it may be the first indication of a nerve problem. There are three common causes of nerve injury: low back disorders, nerve compression as it descends down into the hip, thigh, and shin and medical conditions such as diabetes…

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Motor Issues

Cervical radiculopathy is a condition caused by compression of a cervical nerve root, which can result in pain and sensorimotor deficits. Nerve roots are mixed nerves which are responsible for sensory and motor function.  There are eight cervical nerve roots that branch off from the spinal cord, labeled from C1-C8. Each cervical nerve root supplies a particular region of skin, called a dermatome,and innervates certain groups of muscles, called a myotome. When the cervical nerve root is compressed, the sensory supply to the dermatome in the upper limb can be altered. This can lead to pain, decreased sensation, the feeling of pins and needles, and even numbness. This can also coincide with muscle weakness, and a decreased reflex response.

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Nerve Pain in the Thoracic Spine

The thoracic spine is the part of the spine below the neck (cervical spine) and above the low back (lumbar spine). It is often referred to as the mid back. Nerves exit the thoracic spine at each level and can become irritated, compressed or injured, resulting in pain and dysfunction. This is commonly referred to as thoracic radiculopathy or pinched nerve.

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Shoulder Joint Pain

Shoulder joint pain is the third most common reason that people see their primary care physician (1). It is commonly experienced by people who use their hands overhead a lot, particularly in occupations such as painting and construction. Individuals who train with repetitive overhead movements, such as tennis players, swimmers, and basketball players, are also prone to develop shoulder joint pain. The symptoms and progression of pain in the shoulder joint can vary from person to person, depending on what is causing it. We’ll discuss the causes of shoulder pain, how it is diagnosed, and how it is treated.

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Thoracic Facet Joint Pain

Symptoms of a thoracic facet joint injury will vary depending upon severity of the injury and which facet joint is injured. The joints have established pain referral patterns (2). Drefus et al demonstrated that pain from a given facet joint does not occur in the immediate area of the joint in 75% of cases. Rather, it refers to an area away from the joint. For example, pain from injury of the T3/4 facet is felt along the inside border of the scapula. Unfortunately, there is significant overlap between the thoracic referral patterns which can complicate identifying the exact facet joint…

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Thoracic Spine Pain

Simply put thoracic spine pain is pain that arises from the thoracic spine.  It may be acute or chronic.  It may be constant or intermittent. It may be mild or can be so severe as to take your breath away.  To better understand thoracic spine pain please review the sections below. The thoracic spine is that part of the spine that is sandwiched between the neck and low back.  Many refer to it as the middle section of your spine.  It starts at the base of your neck and ends at the bottom of your ribs. The thoracic spine is the longest region in the spine.

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Tingling Sensation in the Hands

Have you ever felt the sensation of a thousand tiny pins and needles pricking your hands or the subtle, electric tingling that runs down your fingers like a gentle current? Tingling sensations in the hands are more common than you might think and can be triggered by a multitude of factors, from temporary nerve compression to chronic medical conditions.  While often dismissed as a momentary inconvenience, this seemingly innocuous tingling can sometimes be a signal from your body, a signpost pointing to underlying health concerns. In this article, we delve into the intriguing world of tingling sensations in the hands, unraveling the causes, potential implications, and, most importantly, what you can do to address them.

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Conventional Treatments

Treatment for bone spurs depends on the severity of symptoms and the location of the spur. Many people with bone spurs require no treatment. When necessary, options include:

  • Pain Relievers: Over-the-counter pain medications like ibuprofen or acetaminophen can help manage symptoms.
  • Physical Therapy: Exercises can improve flexibility, strengthen muscles around the joint, and reduce pain.
  • Corticosteroid Injections: These can reduce inflammation and pain in the affected area.
  • Weight Management: Reducing weight can decrease pressure on joints, alleviating symptoms.
  • Orthotics or Supportive Devices: For spurs in the feet, custom-made shoes or inserts can help relieve pressure.
  • Surgery: In cases where bone spurs cause significant pain or mobility issues and conservative treatments have failed, surgery may be necessary to remove the spurs and repair any associated damage.

Preventive measures, such as maintaining a healthy weight, engaging in regular, moderate exercise, and using ergonomic tools and supports, can help reduce the risk of developing bone spurs. If you suspect you have bone spurs or are experiencing symptoms, consulting with a healthcare provider is crucial for proper diagnosis and management.

Our Doctors

Christopher J. Centeno, MD

Christopher J. Centeno, M.D. is an international expert and specialist in Interventional Orthopedics and the clinical use of bone marrow concentrate in orthopedics. He is board-certified in physical medicine and rehabilitation with a subspecialty of pain medicine through The American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Dr. Centeno is one of the few physicians in the world with extensive experience in the culture expansion of and clinical use of adult bone marrow concentrate to treat orthopedic injuries. His clinic incorporates a variety of revolutionary pain management techniques to bring its broad patient base relief and results. Dr. Centeno treats patients from all over the US who…

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John Schultz, MD

John R. Schultz M.D. is a national expert and specialist in Interventional Orthopedics and the clinical use of bone marrow concentrate for orthopedic injuries. He is board certified in Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine and underwent fellowship training in both. Dr. Schultz has extensive experience with same day as well as culture expanded bone marrow concentrate and sees patients at the CSC Broomfield, Colorado Clinic, as well the Regenexx Clinic in Grand Cayman. Dr. Schultz emphasis is on the evaluation and treatment of thoracic and cervical disc, facet, nerve, and ligament injuries including the non-surgical treatment of Craniocervical instability (CCI). Dr. Schultz trained at George Washington School of…

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John Pitts, M.D.

Dr. Pitts is originally from Chicago, IL but is a medical graduate of Vanderbilt School of Medicine in Nashville, TN. After Vanderbilt, he completed a residency in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R) at Emory University in Atlanta, GA. The focus of PM&R is the restoration of function and quality of life. In residency, he gained much experience in musculoskeletal medicine, rehabilitation, spine, and sports medicine along with some regenerative medicine. He also gained significant experience in fluoroscopically guided spinal procedures and peripheral injections. However, Dr. Pitts wanted to broaden his skills and treatment options beyond the current typical standards of care.

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Jason Markle, D.O.

Post-residency, Dr. Markle was selected to the Interventional Orthopedic Fellowship program at the Centeno-Schultz Clinic. During his fellowship, he gained significant experience in the new field of Interventional Orthopedics and regenerative medicine, honing his skills in advanced injection techniques into the spine and joints treating patients with autologous, bone marrow concentrate and platelet solutions. Dr. Markle then accepted a full-time attending physician position at the Centeno-Schultz Clinic, where he both treats patients and trains Interventional Orthopedics fellows. Dr. Markle is an active member of the Interventional Orthopedic Foundation and serves as a course instructor, where he trains physicians from around the world.

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Brandon T. Money, D.O., M.S.

Dr. Money is an Indiana native who now proudly calls Colorado home. He attended medical school at Kansas City University and then returned to Indiana to complete a Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation residency program at Indiana University, where he was trained on non-surgical methods to improve health and function as well as rehabilitative care following trauma, stroke, spinal cord injury, brain injury, etc. Dr. Money has been following the ideology behind Centeno-Schultz Clinic and Regenexx since he was in medical school, as he believed there had to be a better way to care for patients than the status quo. The human body has incredible healing capabilities…

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More Resources

  • Understanding the Thoracic and Lumbar Spines

    The thoracic spine and lumbar spine make up a vital nexus of stability and mobility in the human body. In this exploration, we delve into the biomechanics and complexities that define these regions, unraveling their significance in posture, movement, and overall well-being.  Understanding the thoracic and lumbar spine not only illustrates the mechanics of our…

  • Knee Pain Location Chart: Know What The Pain In Your Knee Means

    The knee joint is the largest compound synovial joint of the human body. The joint has bones, cartilage, muscles, and bursae that are held together by ligaments and tendons. Damage to any of these structures can give rise to knee pain. The location of knee pain can be very telling, and can help narrow down…

  • Neck X-Ray

    The neck is a vital and complex part of the human anatomy, supporting the head and facilitating essential functions like movement, breathing, and communication. When neck pain, injuries, or other symptoms arise, healthcare providers often turn to diagnostic tools such as neck X-rays to assess the condition of the cervical spine and surrounding structures. Healthy…

  • The L5 Vertebra: Everything You Need to Know

    The spine, consisting of 33 individual bones called vertebrae, is divided into five major regions: cervical (neck), thoracic (upper back), lumbar (lower back), sacral (pelvic region), and coccygeal (tailbone). These vertebrae are separated by intervertebral discs, which act as cushions and allow for flexibility in movement. The lumbar spine, also known as the lower back,…

  • Why Does My Neck Hurt?

    Neck pain can result from various factors, including poor posture, muscle strain, injury, or underlying medical conditions. It can be treated effectively when diagnosed properly. Treatment options may include physical therapy, pain management, exercise, and lifestyle changes to address the root causes of the pain and significantly improve your comfort and quality of life. If…

  • L5 S1 Or Lumbosacral Joint: What Is It And What Should You Be Wary Of?

    The L5 S1 joint, or the lumbosacral joint, is a critical joint. It lies between the lumbar segment of the spine and the auricular processes of the sacrum. The L5-S1 joint plays a vital role in transmitting the weight of the body via the sacrum and ilium downwards. The weight is distributed to the femur…

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