Skip to Main Content
Make an Appointment

Knee Twitching & Spasms

Knee twitching and or spasms are common occurrences that can be caused by a variety of factors. In most cases, it is not a cause for concern and does not require treatment. However, in some instances, knee twitching may be a sign of a more serious condition.

Knee twitching is often accompanied by a feeling of pins and needles or tingling in the knee. It may also be accompanied by a burning sensation. The twitching usually occurs intermittently and lasts for a few seconds.

There are a number of things that can cause knee twitching. Some of the most common causes include:

  1. Muscle spasms – Muscles in the body can sometimes spasm involuntarily, causing the knee to twitch.
  2. Nerve compression – When the nerves that run through the knee are compressed, they can cause the muscles in the knee to twitch.
  3. Pinched nerve – A pinched nerve in the back can cause pain and tingling in the knees. This may also cause the knee to twitch.
  4. Overuse of joints – Continuous or excessive use of a joint can eventually lead to pain and swelling. This may also result in spasms and twitching in the knee.
  5. Knee injury – Twitching may indicate a nerve or muscle injury to the knee. Depending on the severity of the injury, this can be a serious condition that requires medical attention.
  6. Stress – When muscles are tense or experiencing stress, they can sometimes twitch involuntarily.

Conditions Associated with Knee Twitching & Spasms

Failed Back Surgery Syndrome

Failed Back Surgery Syndrome also called failed back is a clinical condition in which patients who have undergone low back surgery continue to have pain and dysfunction.  Said another way the surgery that was intended to reduce pain and increase function FAILED. That’s right, the surgery failed. You had the surgery, struggled with the pain postoperatively, diligently participated in physical therapy and yet the pain and limitation are still there.  Unfortunately, this occurs frequently.   Estimates range from 20-40% of patients who undergo low back surgery will develop Failed Back Surgery Syndrome. Pain is the most common symptom of Failed Back Surgery Syndrome…

Read More About Failed Back Surgery Syndrome

Knee Arthritis

In the human body, a joint is simply where 2 ends of bone come together. At the ends of these bones, there is a thick substance called “Hyaline Cartilage” that lines the ends. Hyaline cartilage is extremely slippery which allows the two ends of the bone to slide on top of each other. Then there is a capsule that connects the two ends filled with “synovial fluid” that acts as a further lubricant to make it more slippery! Arthritis in the knee is defined by loss of the hyaline cartilage plus other changes that happen to the bone such as additional bone being laid down (bone spurs/osteophytes). The cartilage layer is worn down to the point of exposing the underlying bone they cover…

Read More About Knee Arthritis

Patellar Tendonitis

What is the Patellar Tendon? A tendon is a piece of connective tissue that connects muscle to bone. It serves to move the bone or a given joint. The patellar tendon is a major tendon in the knee. It is located at the bottom of the kneecap (patella) and stretches down to the shin. The patellar tendon enables you to extend your knee, kick, run, and jump. What is Patellar Tendinitis? Patellar tendinitis is an irritation and inflammation of the tendon that connects your kneecap (patella) to your shinbone. Patellar tendinitis, also known as jumper’s knee, can affect anyone. The most common symptom is pain at the shin or lowest part of the kneecap…

Read More About Patellar Tendonitis

Patellofemoral Syndrome

The kneecap is also known as the patella. The thigh bone is the femur. The patellofemoral joint is formed by the kneecap and the grooved surface of the thigh bone. The patella slides up and down in a grooved track in the femur. The groove is more specifically called the trochlear groove. Like a train that travels on a track, under ideal conditions the patella tracks up and down in the trochlear groove. What is Patellofemoral Syndrome? Patellofemoral syndrome is a medical condition characterized by discomfort in the front of the knee and around the patella. Patellofemoral syndrome may also be known as “jumper’s knee” or “runner’s knee.”…

Read More About Patellofemoral Syndrome

Peroneal Nerve Injury

The common peroneal nerve branches behind the knee and this could be irritated from any overuse activity, surgery, instability, or any compression on the outside of the knee. Typically, this will present as pain on the outside of the knee radiating towards the baby toe, the calf, and the lateral shin towards the lateral ankle. What Causes Peroneal Nerve Compression? There are many potential causes of peroneal nerve compression, such as overuse activities, surgery, instability, or any compression on the outside of the knee. Trauma and nerve compression, especially caused by a fractured or dislocated ankle, can all cause injury to the peroneal nerve. Causes include:

Read More About Peroneal Nerve Injury

Spinal Stenosis

Spinal stenosis is the narrowing of the central spinal canal and is a cause of significant pain and disability.  Common causes of spinal stenosis include disc protrusion, facet overgrowth and ligamentum flavum thickening.  Surgery is often chosen when conservative therapies fail despite the lack of convincing evidence that it is a superior treatment option.  Are there alternatives to back surgery for spinal stenosis?  Yes. Regenexx DDD utilizes precise platelet injections into the facets, muscles, and ligaments to treat the lumbar stenosis, treating all of the components of the issue, which is crucial. Spinal stenosis is often an age-related condition attributed…

Read More About Spinal Stenosis

FREE eBook Download (Click the Book Cover)

Ready to get help for your Knee Twitching & Spasms?

Get Help